ANC NETHERLANDS MISSION

DOCUMENTS IN DUTCH

TRANSLATED BY TOINE EGGENHUIZEN

 

Folder 1

 Bundle 1

 

Set of documents relating to the application of Kumar Sanjay (real name Girja Singh) for a residence permit in The Netherlands.

 

Documents relating to Robert Chawula who, according to a statement, had worker in “the ANC gardens near Transkei, namely Witwatersrand in the Lufafa valley”. Further is there a reference to him carrying messages to the black township near Cape Town. (sic) He also was involved with collecting funds for Oliver Tumbal. The authorities doubted very much if he was a genuine refugee from apartheid. They realized that in spite of references to ANC his knowledge of the organization was very sketchy. His request for asylum was declined.

(Chawula does not sound South African to me, my comment Toine!)

 

 

Bundle 2

A commission of the Council of TILBURG provided a detailed report on the situation in SA making adjustments to its policies in response to the changes taking place there. From a boycott-of-SA-products mode one needs to move towards supporting development of democracy, interaction and so on

The subsidy to ZAPT (Zuidelijk Africa Platform Tilburg; Southern Africa Platform Tilburg) of DG30,000 for 1992 shall be used to support civics in SA, especially Vaal Community Development Trust. A sum of DG 6,656 will be given to support ad hoc activities by ZAPT.

They further contributed DG 5.000 towards the LOTA (Local authorities against apartheid) and want to propose to disband this organization towards the end of 1993.

 

The request to support ANC office in Amsterdam was declined.

 

 

Bundle 3

There is a note, presumably from secretary, to Johnny (Nchabeleng) dd 10-09-1991.

 

There was a message from H/Q asking to confirm the fax and enquiring if any action was taken.

Because you’ll probably be in after 16.00 hrs, I phoned H/Q and spoke to cde Neo. I informed him that you are the only one with access to the bank account and that Bobby’s signature is no longer valid. They were pleased about that. He asked if we had more problems in respect of possible expenses made by Bobby; we must inform so that H/Q can instruct you about what to do.

I explained the problem about the house and the telephone. His answer was: Bobby has immediately to be evicted from the house. You have to take action immediately.

We have to fax Neo the address of the landlord (housing association) to enable H/Q to give you the instruction to cancel immediately the contract between housing association and K.Sanjay. The same applies to telephone and electricity.

 

The relevant address are attached.

 

Bundle 4

STATEMENT AS RESULT OF INTERVIEW ABOUT APPLICATION FOR POLITICAL ASYLUM IN THE NETHERLANDS.

 

LEONARD DAVID FADDEL, born Cape Town 13-03-1950

YVONNE VIRDON, born Johannesburg 10-02-1949

Their children

ODETTE FADDEL, Johannesburg 16-07-1968

SHAUGHAN WAYNE FADDEL, Johannesburg 06-08-1969

CLINTON DAVID FADDEL, Johannesburg 09-10-1970

NICOLETTE DANA FADDEL, Johannesburg 24-08-1973

LEO DORON FADDEL, Johannesburg 12-01-1985

 

Police discovered a quantity of marihuana in a post box hired in L.D.Faddel’s name. The Amsterdam police arrested him. After his release he was handed over to the immigration authorities. He then made an appeal for asylum. A Magistrate’s Court in Amsterdam had ordered his release and financial compensation.

Follows a summary of relevant documents etc accompanying the statement as prepared by an official of the immigration police, W.Ruitenbeek, on 25th June 1986.

-.-.-.-.-.

 

Leonard David FADDEL was born in Cape Town on 13-03-1950, now residing in Amsterdam, Churchilllaan 83I. The interview was conducted in English with the assistance of an interpreter, Mr S.A.D.Saib.

 

Having pointed out the need to tell the truth he answered the questions as follows:

 

In due course during the next few weeks I hope to obtain official documents from SA regarding the facts for which I will be persecuted in South Africa. As soon as I receive these I will pass these on to my legal representative G.Caarls in Amsterdam.

I flew out of SA on 24-04-1985 on my own. I flew to London and, after a few days, I came to Holland.

This was not the first time that I left SA. I have visited Rhodesia, Botswana and Swaziland. I have been to Brasil as well. Those were business trips. The penultimate trip out of SA was to Brasil. That was about 9 months before I left SA for the last time in April 1985. I was then for about a week in Brasil and I had used my own passport. When I left SA for the last time I used a false passport. That is the passport in the name of Cambell.

 

My family arrived in the Netherlands on 17-04-1986. They used their own passports and had obtained Dutch visas. My wife returned to SA around 30-04-1986 with the two youngest children. The three elder ones remained with me here and have not left the (this) country since. Last Saturday, 21-06-1986 my wife and the two youngest children returned to the Netherlands; their visas were still valid.

 

On my arrival in The Netherlands in 1985 I made contact with friends whom I knew from SA. I staid with them for the first two months here. If it is not really necessary I’d rather not mention their names. I then found accommodation in Amsterdam. That was Utrechtsedwarsstraat 81 I. I found work as well. I worked independently and did renovations to building. Since 16-02-1986 the Amsterdam Security Centre as locksmith employs me. I earn DC 350 per week (net). In addition the company pays our accommodation in Churchillaan. I approached the company myself and they employed me almost immediately. At the same time they pro\vided the apartment in Churchillaan.

 

The SA police in Johannesburg confiscated my own passport in September 1984. That was shortly after I had returned from Brasil. This passport was never returned to me. If I hadn’t made that trip to Brasil they would not have know that I had a passport.

My ANC contacts knew about my problems in SA and they organized a new passport. That is the passport in the name of Cambell. I filed in a normal application form for this. Hasan CASSAMJEE assisted me. He is an Asian and he was my contact person in the ANC. I only know that he arranged my passport with the assistance of someone I only know as Dan who works in the passport office. Hasan is presently in SA and he is a free man. They know he is involved with the ANC, but they don’t know how important he is. He is very clever and manages to stay out of trouble. I know he has an executive function within the ANC and has direct contact with the ANC in Zambia. I trust all this will be dealt with as very confidential. I would have preferred not to mention his name, but I understand that this is necessary.

When my wife returned to SA from the Netherlands she was under observation. Therefore, she did not have any further contact with Hasan. White friends who were sympathetic to us, assisted my wife could leave again without any hassles. They arranged tickets without registering on computer. My wife also was fortunate that she had two passports. She had lost her first passport. She then applied and received a new one. Thereafter she found her first passport. This first one was confiscated. Why they did not realize that she had a second one, I don’t understand. Some civil servant must have made a mistake. Her old passport was confiscate around November 1985 by the SA police. She was accused of being in touch with me in the Netherlands.

 

From January 1979 till April 1981, the exact dates I can’t remember, I was imprisoned in Zonderwater prison in the Transvaal. That was the only I was imprisoned. Thereafter I have been detained twice. The first time I was detained for 48 hours and the other time for 6 weeks. For 2 weeks I was in the political section of John Vorster Square police station and the remainder among ordinary prisoners.

My wife was never detained. Only when she returned to SA she was met and taken home to be placed under house arrest. My children have never been detained.

 

My official address in SA was: 282 Market Street, Johannesburg – North. I resided there with my family till mid-1983. I left my place because of problems I expected with the security branch. I discussed this with my wife. We decided to arrange a divorce to protect her from problems because of me. It also allowed us to place our assets in her name.

 

Then I rented two homes in the suburbs of Johannesburg: 19 Rocket Road, Kensington and 245 Commissioner Street, Belgravia. I had a special reason the rent these places. The purpose was to hide people who were sought. These were often persons from neighbouring countries who did not have any official status in SA. They had to wait for official papers. There were also people sent on missions like assassinations or persons to train black in military and sabotage techniques. I used to hide first in my own house. That is also a reason I left, for I feared for my family. Anyway, it was not easy for my family, because the children saw all this but were not allowed to talk about it. The people I hid were persons who would not meekly surrender when discovered but would have fought back.

 

I married Yvonne Virdon in Cape Town on 31-01-1968; this was for both of us the first and only marriage. We divorced officially in February 1984, for political reasons, for her safety and that of the children. We have got 5 children: our daughter Odette (16-07-1968), our son Shaughan Wayne (06-08-1970), our son Clinton David (09-10-1973), our daughter Nicolette Dana (24-08-1973) and our son Leo Doron (12-01-1985). They were all born in Johannesburg. None of our children have passed away.

 

My parents are still alive. They live in Cape Town. They do not agree with my activities. Since 3 years now I don’t have any contact with them. I have 2 brothers and 2 sisters. They also live in SA and I don’t have any contact with them either.

 

I finished high school in SA. I left school in 1967. I did start evening classes but I did not complete this.

In 1968 I had to do military service for 9 months. That is when I started to hate the system in SA.

 

After my military service I started working as a locksmith for my father-in-law until 1972. Then I got a job with Hamdon Enterprises as a national representative. This provided an opportunity to get to know the country as well as it’s borders. This knowledge I used later to smuggle people. I worked at Hamden till 1974. Then I borrowed money to start my own company. This was a security firm. I did this until my departure. My wife continued thereafter. Now the SA authorities have confiscated everything. It was the “All Day and Night Locksmiths”, in Hillbrow, Johannesburg.

 

My wife worked there as well. My children have not been employed. They are still at school. Because I did not see eye to eye with the authorities we sent the children to private schools. In 1986 they were asked to leave. I don’t know if this was done under pressure from the authorities or other parents. My wife then tried to get them in government schools, but there was enormous pressure on them and they did not go to school often.

 

I don’t have family in the Netherlands. The far distant ancestors of my wife came from here but I don’t know if she still got family. I selected this country because I looked for a place where one understands me. Furthermore I investigated that the Netherlands has no extradition treaty with SA. I also knew people from SA living here who could be of assistance in the beginning.

 

During the first two months in the Netherlands I kept my head down. I did this because I did not know how far SA could reach. It did happen once in the beginning that I was dragged from a tram by a white and a black guy and was beaten up. They were South African. They told me to go back. Yes, this is the only incident that happened to me in the Netherlands. I did not report this.

 

I did not report my presence in The Netherlands to the authorities I staid without any difficulties until my arrest because, I think, marihuana was found in my postbox. I had not used my box for 6 months. I had opened a postbox because I did not want to use a residential address. Only when I was detained here did I ask for asylum. I had not wanted to do this before because I was afraid of possible publicity. My family was still in SA. Yes, I one point my family was here, but my wife had to go back to make necessary arrangements. To sort out these business affairs did not work out because everything had been confiscated. My wife could only safeguard jewelry and that is now on it’s way to the Netherlands. My wife had to come first to The Netherlands because we could not communicate. We had to discuss these matters in person.

 

My wife, my children and myself we have only got the SA nationality. I was born as a Roman Catholic, but after my marriage I became a practicing Jew. My wife is Jewish and our children belong to the Jewish faith.

 

I left SA because I expected a long prison sentence, I reckon a 30 years, and because I hated the system.

 

I never committed any act of violence. The same applies to my wife and children. It is true that I did assist people in SA who committed acts of violence with explosives, but as far as I know nobody was insured. I only hid those people. I did not instruct them, although I did make suggestions or gave advice sometimes; the purpose of this advice or suggestion was to spare lives.

 

I got to know the ANC since 1968 when I started work at my father-in-law’s where I got to know a young black guy. I have always had good relations with black people in SA, because I grew up in Woodstock. I realized that this black guy belonged to the ANC. He took me to secret meetings in Soweto and there I got to know Hasan Since then I stayed in contact. Already since 1968 I have been hiding people. Requests for this came from Hasan and from another, Coloured, person named William Stevens. In the beginning it all seemed quite innocent. I knew of course that they were dissidents. After 1972 I knew that the people I assisted were involved in acts of sabotage in SA. I never knew when they had planned this nor if they would stay for longer or shorter periods. Since the mid seventies I received 3 to 4 persons per month. Those were anxious moments. I mean that I later heard that people were arrested and I was afraid that they might give away my address. But it all went well till 1985. My imprisonment had nothing to do with this. That was for a different reason.

 

Willem and Hasan had a proposal. There was a great need for funds. They wanted to use my specific knowledge of locks. I was prepared to teach people how to open locks. I refused to do so if it was in order to assassinate people. I taught people this knowledge. The purpose was to enter government buildings or buildings under control of the state. This would hit the system and not the man in the street. I taught people who could enter rooms of a police station where files of suspects were kept. Occasionally I went with to do a job. That is how on a Sunday morning I was arrested in the Standard Bank in Dunkeld, Johannesburg. The plan was to open a safe. We had hoped to find cash. I was arrested with a black guy, James Ndlela; the other two managed to escape. Thanks to some lawyers I managed to remain free, but in 1979 I was imprisoned. I was sentenced to 8 years, reduced to 4 years and I served 2 years and 3 months. James was sentenced to 11 years and served 5.

After my release I kept a low profile for 6 months. During my imprisonment I realized that nothing could stop this system. I was ashamed to be South African. Black people were badly beaten. I was beaten as well on occasion, but that did not happen openly. Blacks were openly beaten. At times I had to restrain myself not to interfere. One could not interfere otherwise you would be badly beaten as well. I have seen black people beaten to death. I saw a warden beating a prisoner till he fell down. He then took a stone beating him on the head till he was dead. The warden remained on duty. There was no investigation.

 

Six months after my release I went back to “work”. I hid people and taught others my knowledge about locks. Occasionally I went with.

 

In 1984 I was arrested, that time when I was detained for 6 months. I was accused of cooperating with black people against the government. I had to pay bail of R20,000 to be released. My passport was confiscated. During my imprisonment I was beaten and tortured. I received electric shocks and my head was held under water. No, I did not continue to deny. I admitted to 7 break-inns. I did not admit anything political. They did insist but I did not admit. I was arrested that time because in 1984 Willem Stevens was arrested. They followed up on all his contacts and thus came to me as well.

 

In SA my lawyer was Graham Alexander. He is also opposed to the system. His address is Enneschambers. I think that is Market Street, the Market Street in the CBD. The papers I am expecting deal with this case. I expect that this would lead to 30 years.

 

After my arrest in 1984 I discussed with my lawyer about leaving SA. He concurred. After my release I indirectly communicated this to Hasan as well. He too concurred and advised me to go as soon as possible.

 

After my release I has to report twice a day to the police and was under observation. That is why I could not be smuggled in to a neighbouring country. I managed at times to escape the observation. I knew from where they were watching my house, using the backdoor and other people’s houses I sometimes got away without them observing this. Because I had to report twice a strange sort of friendship developed with a police officer. He had an impression that he could persuade me to join his side. This relaxed the observation somewhat. The watched my house in Rocker Street. They were not aware of my other address.

 

I received the passport in the name of Cambell 2 days before my departure. On the day of my departure I reported as usual in the morning. Then I had my hair cut and dyed. Unnoticed I left home. Half an hour before departure of the plane I arrived at the airport. I did not encounter any problems. I flew to London on BOAC. I stayed a few days and then applied for a Dutch visa. Then I came overt to The Netherlands.

On arrival I had about DG50.00 I have during my stay here never received money from Social Welfare. I have always earned my living.

 

I would like to return to SA, my place of birth, but not to the system. I will gladly return once the ANC is in power or if a federal government is set up whereby all are equal. When I go back now I will land in prison. Since I left the police will have no doubt a\bout my involvement. They would be able to extract everything from me. This is not only dangerous for me but for others as well. I would rather end my own life than to go back. I don’t say to ask for sympathy, but this would be the best solution.

 

No, I don’t have anything more to add.

 

The interviewer then met the wife and had a brief chat with the elder two sons. The wife, Yvonne Virdon, explained that she returned from SA via Luxembourg. She had gone back to SA with her youngest child and the other one as company for the baby. She had to try and finalise business. Their company had been confiscate. But she had wanted to sell the house and to see to it that their former employees had been looked after.

She got married 26-02-1985 and they deliberately arranged their divorce on 26-02-1985.

She had never been imprisoned. Her husband had been from 1979 – 1981. That was hard times. He was imprisoned for a criminal act, because we could not divulge the real reason.

As far as the political situation in SA is concerned she had always staid in the background. She knew her husband was hiding people. At first she did not even know what that was about. Later her husband had told her. She herself had never been involved. She looked after the business and after the children to enable him to do other things.

She only learned that her husband was leaving on the day of his departure. In the beginning they had telephone contact, but stopped later being afraid of telephone tapping.

 

She came with the children to the Netherlands to freedom. She did not want her sons to do military service (neither did they), not that she is against service per se, but the system in SA.

The Dutch visa was obtained through a third party. She explained d that she had three passports. The first one had been lost; she applied for a new passport, but found the original one. Then via a friend of Hasan, who that was she did not know, she obtained a third passport. She did this in case the number of the earlier passport was know on the system.

 

On return to SA with her two children two men met her. She was interrogated. They wanted to know if she had met her husband. She admitted this because that was for the sake of the children. She maintained that she did not know what her husband had been up to nor what he was involved in. They took her home.

I got a sort of house arrest. I was allowed to go shopping in the neighbourhood, but otherwise had to remain at home. Every day a policeman in civvies came over to ask the same questions. I realized that if I showed any sympathy for my husband that that would be it. I regretted that I had brought the two children with me. I then pretended that I was willing to cooperate. This lead to them relaxing the surveillance. That gave me an opportunity to get away. On the day of departure everything was arranged, this to prevent that any information would be recorded on computers.

 

I reckon that it will not be possible to return to SA. My last departure will be seen as proof and I expect to land in prison when I return.

 

My sons were not involved in anything in SA. They did not want to do military service and I did not want them to do so. Because my husband was involved they would probably encounter troubles in SA, the same applies to my daughter Odette.

 

The interviewer had a brief chat with the two older sons. They confirmed that they had not been involved in political issues in SA. They confirmed that they did want to do military service. I did not further interrogate them.

 

 

Folder 2

Bundle 5

ANC letter to NOVIB (Dutch Development Agency) requesting financial support for 1993. Since it’s establishment in 1988 the ANC office was supported the Municipality of Amsterdam, subsidies from various NGO’s and several municipalities organized in LOTA (Local government councils against apartheid). These latter subsidies fell away in 1992.

The ANC leadership has changed the role of the ANC office in The Netherlands. The dissemination of information remains important, but the office will in addition concentrate on Dutch business and trade unions.

The office is increasing contact with government ministries and major political parties. It refers to a coordinating role in the socio/economic field of ANC offices in Europe.

 

The letter acknowledges the annual subsidy from NOVIB i.e.. DG 25.000 and request a similar amount for 1992 as well as 1993.

 

Then follows a statement of account.

 

This refers to the release of Mandela and unbanning of ANC. Therefore the police has no more direct link to the incident room. The office had to install it’s own security system.

 

Bundle 6

ANC office in Amsterdam requested various municipalities for financial support. Local Councils only support local groups, NGOs, etc and could not support ANC office in Amsterdam.

 

 

Folder 3

Bundle 7

ADVOKATENKANTOOR INGELSE

 

19 Feb 1988:

Agreement reached with ANC Office and AABN (Anti Apartheid Beweging Nederland) to allow them to rent office space. One clause states roughly if the establishment of an ANC office on their premises may lead to activities against the ANC or the premises which may lead to danger which may effect security of people, assets, documents the ANC will be requested to vacate the space.

 

31 March 1988

The lawyers office has noticed attacks on ANC personnel in Bruxelles (twice) and Paris/ Although supporting the justified struggle they have no option then to ask the ANC to leave. Their offices deal primarily with social justice issues. A police protection presence for the ANC might deter illegal immigrants, offenders and so on to feel free to enter their legal offices.

 

PTT-POST

30 Jan 1989

ANC had requested the Post Office to check mail. P/O indicates their job is delivery of mail, not contents.

 

Various documents relating to telephone connection, canceling of lines, rental agreements between ANC and Municipality of Amsterdam.

Bundle 8

Miscellaneous correspondence on setting up of ANC office in Netherlands; requests for subsidy and support; Report of meeting between Sanjay Kumar of the ANC, Fons of AABN, and Jules of KZA.